Why Clickbait Fake News, Part I

First, let’s start with clickbait.

An example of clickbait is a link that appears on a website with a catchy title that arouses your curiosity and makes you want to click on the link.

How does clickbait work? People surfing the web click on the link. The owner of the web site gets paid by advertisers who place their ads on the clickbait web site.

An even more insidious type of clickbait is the one that has you click through multiple pages of the website to get to the end of a story, building anticipation that there will be some type of emotional payoff for continuing to click. You’ve see them. “This father and daughter took the same picture for 30 years. Try not to cry when you see the last one.”

Who wouldn’t click on that? You want to see a proud father holding his little daughter, the little girl growing up, graduating high school, etc. And you expect to see the last one with a 30 year old woman holding her father’s ashes in a box or some other type of tear-jerking picture.

Well, if you’ve clicked on one these stories, you’ve taken the bait

Disclaimer: This site is clickbait.